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Nauczył się obróbki drewna oglądając filmy na You Tube (20)

EN_01298875_0001 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0002 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0003 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0004 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0005 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0006 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0007 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0008 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0009 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0010 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0011 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0012 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0013 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0014 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0015 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0016 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0017 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0018 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0019 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298875_0020 COV
Chris Fisher from England has learnt the craft of woodturning using only You Tube videos for guidance. Even more remarkable is the fact the Chris is completely blind. Fisher, 48, began to lose his sight to toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be contracted from animal waste, back in 2008. The pathogen can sometimes lay dormant for years and the Fisher believes he may have picked it up as a young boy while playing. Over a four-week period the father of one lost his vision permanently, after which he embarked on a period of rehabilitation that allowed him to learn how to live day to day as a blind person. Now, ten years on, Lancashire based Fisher, previously an engineer, has not only learnt to get by, but is an inspiration to others, particularly those who know him for his woodwork. So, how did he get into woodturning? Fisher learnt the age-old skill having lost his sight completely, after deciding that he wanted to make himself a vampire stake. Knowing that he wanted something stylised and artistic, but unable to find anyone to take on the task, Fisher turned to YouTube. Before purchasing his own kit and making the first cut, Fisher spent 480 hours listening to videos and tutorials online. Woodturning has helped Fisher gain a focus as he uses hand-held tools to shape a piece of wood while it rotates on a mechanical lathe. He can create bowls, candlesticks, goblets and other items. According to Fisher safety isn???t an issue; he just makes sure that he is extra careful as he works, which he believes makes his safer than most in the trade who may become complacent. And it's not just the love of vampire ephemera that keeps Fisher at the lathe; he does it for his 17-year-old son Charlie, as well. An inspiration to his son, Fisher is now using his experience to help others and regularly talks in public at business luncheons and corporate events. According to Chris??? wife Nicola, many watching Chris at work don???t realise at first that he is blind. ??sSome watch
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
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