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EN_01298874_0001 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298874_0002 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298874_0003 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298874_0004 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298874_0005 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298874_0006 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298874_0007 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298874_0008 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298874_0009 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298874_0010 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
EN_01298874_0011 COV
**VIDEO AVAILABLE. CONTACT INFO@COVER-IMAGES.COM TO RECEIVE.** A King Cobra snake at Denver Zoo is now in remission after battling a disease as deadly as its own bite. The 18-year-old snake, a resident at the Colorado zoo, has spent nearly a year battling lymphosarcoma, a type of cancer affecting its scales. But now, thanks to the efforts of staff there, he is slithering his way back to good health. Associate veterinarian Betsy Stringer explained zookeepers were suspicious when they noticed purple scales on the unnamed snake and a biopsy of the abnormal scales confirmed it was cancer. To safely run tests, including biopsies and x-rays, the king cobra was put under anaesthesia. Zookeepers were able to keep the 13-foot-long reptile asleep by keeping its head in a restraint tube hooked up to a gas anaesthesia machine. After confirming the king cobra had cancer, Stringer worked with a veterinary oncologist at Colorado State University to come up with a treatment plan. And if you???re wondering exactly how you get a deadly snake to take its medicine, the staff came up with the idea of delivering the chemotherapy treatment every three weeks in the form of a pill, which was placed in the throat of a dead rat that was fed to the cobra. Regular blood work checks confirmed that the snake was responding to the drug successfully. And, according to Stringer, despite the chemotherapy the plucky reptile had no decline in his mood, or his appetite! A biopsy in December 2017 confirmed the treatment was a success, and the king cobra was officially in remission. Although generally Cobras only live until around 20 years-old, staff at the zoo were keen to give their resident a few more years. Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Denver, Colorado, United States When: 12 Jan 2018 Credit: Denver Zoo/Cover Images **EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.**
EDITORIAL USE ONLY. IMAGES ONLY TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH EDITORIAL STORY. IMAGE COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER AND/OR SUPPLIER.
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