niedziela, 21 stycznia 2018
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Wyburzanie historycznego kościoła w Niemczech (7)

EN_01298645_0001 EUR
Pics shows: A brown coal surface mine expansion will come in place of the church; A 130-year-old church was destroyed to allow the expansion of a coal mine despite protests from locals and environmentalists that saw four people injured. The Catholic Immerather Church was a beacon of tranquillity and contemplation for more than a century for the citizens of Immerath, part of the municipality of Erkelenz in the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Now the church has been however flattened by demolition workers in a two-day operation. The church built in 1888 was taken down to make way for an expansion of the Garzweiler surface brown coal mine owned by mining operator RWE. The open pit will reach the location of the church by the end of 2018. The old town of Immerath is abandoned apart from just three properties, local media report. But locals and Greenpeace activists protested against the destruction of the beautiful church and rural landscape. Demolition work was delayed for hours as activists held a sit-in at the entrance to the site while others scaled the church tower with a Greenpeace banner and some chained themselves to an excavator. Thirteen unnamed protestors were arrested and had criminal charges filed for trespassing and endangering traffic. Two workers of RWE and two activists received light injures during the protests, none of whom were named in reports. Although there is only a pile of debris left over, RWE has strengthened its safety measures at the construction site. Guide Steffen of RWE said: "We have no interests in the work being disrupted again."
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01298645_0002 EUR
Pics shows: Greenpeace protesters climbing the church with a banner; A 130-year-old church was destroyed to allow the expansion of a coal mine despite protests from locals and environmentalists that saw four people injured. The Catholic Immerather Church was a beacon of tranquillity and contemplation for more than a century for the citizens of Immerath, part of the municipality of Erkelenz in the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Now the church has been however flattened by demolition workers in a two-day operation. The church built in 1888 was taken down to make way for an expansion of the Garzweiler surface brown coal mine owned by mining operator RWE. The open pit will reach the location of the church by the end of 2018. The old town of Immerath is abandoned apart from just three properties, local media report. But locals and Greenpeace activists protested against the destruction of the beautiful church and rural landscape. Demolition work was delayed for hours as activists held a sit-in at the entrance to the site while others scaled the church tower with a Greenpeace banner and some chained themselves to an excavator. Thirteen unnamed protestors were arrested and had criminal charges filed for trespassing and endangering traffic. Two workers of RWE and two activists received light injures during the protests, none of whom were named in reports. Although there is only a pile of debris left over, RWE has strengthened its safety measures at the construction site. Guide Steffen of RWE said: "We have no interests in the work being disrupted again."
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01298645_0003 EUR
Pics shows: A Greenpeace sit-in in front of the church; A 130-year-old church was destroyed to allow the expansion of a coal mine despite protests from locals and environmentalists that saw four people injured. The Catholic Immerather Church was a beacon of tranquillity and contemplation for more than a century for the citizens of Immerath, part of the municipality of Erkelenz in the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Now the church has been however flattened by demolition workers in a two-day operation. The church built in 1888 was taken down to make way for an expansion of the Garzweiler surface brown coal mine owned by mining operator RWE. The open pit will reach the location of the church by the end of 2018. The old town of Immerath is abandoned apart from just three properties, local media report. But locals and Greenpeace activists protested against the destruction of the beautiful church and rural landscape. Demolition work was delayed for hours as activists held a sit-in at the entrance to the site while others scaled the church tower with a Greenpeace banner and some chained themselves to an excavator. Thirteen unnamed protestors were arrested and had criminal charges filed for trespassing and endangering traffic. Two workers of RWE and two activists received light injures during the protests, none of whom were named in reports. Although there is only a pile of debris left over, RWE has strengthened its safety measures at the construction site. Guide Steffen of RWE said: "We have no interests in the work being disrupted again."
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01298645_0004 EUR
Pics shows: Protest signs and flowers at the fences barricading the entrance to the church; A 130-year-old church was destroyed to allow the expansion of a coal mine despite protests from locals and environmentalists that saw four people injured. The Catholic Immerather Church was a beacon of tranquillity and contemplation for more than a century for the citizens of Immerath, part of the municipality of Erkelenz in the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Now the church has been however flattened by demolition workers in a two-day operation. The church built in 1888 was taken down to make way for an expansion of the Garzweiler surface brown coal mine owned by mining operator RWE. The open pit will reach the location of the church by the end of 2018. The old town of Immerath is abandoned apart from just three properties, local media report. But locals and Greenpeace activists protested against the destruction of the beautiful church and rural landscape. Demolition work was delayed for hours as activists held a sit-in at the entrance to the site while others scaled the church tower with a Greenpeace banner and some chained themselves to an excavator. Thirteen unnamed protestors were arrested and had criminal charges filed for trespassing and endangering traffic. Two workers of RWE and two activists received light injures during the protests, none of whom were named in reports. Although there is only a pile of debris left over, RWE has strengthened its safety measures at the construction site. Guide Steffen of RWE said: "We have no interests in the work being disrupted again."
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01298645_0005 EUR
Pics shows: The historic church being destroyed; A 130-year-old church was destroyed to allow the expansion of a coal mine despite protests from locals and environmentalists that saw four people injured. The Catholic Immerather Church was a beacon of tranquillity and contemplation for more than a century for the citizens of Immerath, part of the municipality of Erkelenz in the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Now the church has been however flattened by demolition workers in a two-day operation. The church built in 1888 was taken down to make way for an expansion of the Garzweiler surface brown coal mine owned by mining operator RWE. The open pit will reach the location of the church by the end of 2018. The old town of Immerath is abandoned apart from just three properties, local media report. But locals and Greenpeace activists protested against the destruction of the beautiful church and rural landscape. Demolition work was delayed for hours as activists held a sit-in at the entrance to the site while others scaled the church tower with a Greenpeace banner and some chained themselves to an excavator. Thirteen unnamed protestors were arrested and had criminal charges filed for trespassing and endangering traffic. Two workers of RWE and two activists received light injures during the protests, none of whom were named in reports. Although there is only a pile of debris left over, RWE has strengthened its safety measures at the construction site. Guide Steffen of RWE said: "We have no interests in the work being disrupted again."
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01298645_0006 EUR
Pics shows: The historic church being destroyed; A 130-year-old church was destroyed to allow the expansion of a coal mine despite protests from locals and environmentalists that saw four people injured. The Catholic Immerather Church was a beacon of tranquillity and contemplation for more than a century for the citizens of Immerath, part of the municipality of Erkelenz in the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Now the church has been however flattened by demolition workers in a two-day operation. The church built in 1888 was taken down to make way for an expansion of the Garzweiler surface brown coal mine owned by mining operator RWE. The open pit will reach the location of the church by the end of 2018. The old town of Immerath is abandoned apart from just three properties, local media report. But locals and Greenpeace activists protested against the destruction of the beautiful church and rural landscape. Demolition work was delayed for hours as activists held a sit-in at the entrance to the site while others scaled the church tower with a Greenpeace banner and some chained themselves to an excavator. Thirteen unnamed protestors were arrested and had criminal charges filed for trespassing and endangering traffic. Two workers of RWE and two activists received light injures during the protests, none of whom were named in reports. Although there is only a pile of debris left over, RWE has strengthened its safety measures at the construction site. Guide Steffen of RWE said: "We have no interests in the work being disrupted again."
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ
EN_01298645_0007 EUR
Pics shows: The historic church being destroyed; A 130-year-old church was destroyed to allow the expansion of a coal mine despite protests from locals and environmentalists that saw four people injured. The Catholic Immerather Church was a beacon of tranquillity and contemplation for more than a century for the citizens of Immerath, part of the municipality of Erkelenz in the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Now the church has been however flattened by demolition workers in a two-day operation. The church built in 1888 was taken down to make way for an expansion of the Garzweiler surface brown coal mine owned by mining operator RWE. The open pit will reach the location of the church by the end of 2018. The old town of Immerath is abandoned apart from just three properties, local media report. But locals and Greenpeace activists protested against the destruction of the beautiful church and rural landscape. Demolition work was delayed for hours as activists held a sit-in at the entrance to the site while others scaled the church tower with a Greenpeace banner and some chained themselves to an excavator. Thirteen unnamed protestors were arrested and had criminal charges filed for trespassing and endangering traffic. Two workers of RWE and two activists received light injures during the protests, none of whom were named in reports. Although there is only a pile of debris left over, RWE has strengthened its safety measures at the construction site. Guide Steffen of RWE said: "We have no interests in the work being disrupted again."
NAJWYŻSZA DOSTĘPNA ROZDZIELCZOŚĆ