niedziela, 21 stycznia 2018
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Pomoc uzależnionym od narkotyków w USA - NYT (26)

! EN_01296949_0004 NYT
The former sober living residence, now a private home, where Gary Benefield, an addict, died after checking in for treatment with A Better Tomorrow. Benefield's death in July 2010 kicked off a six-year battle that very nearly brought down American Addiction Centers, one of the biggest addiction-treatment companies in the country. (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0007 NYT
Chris Drose works from home in Atlanta. As a college student, Drose became fascinated with American Addiction Centers, one of the biggest addiction-treatment companies in the country and helped launch a financial attack against its stock. (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0008 NYT
The bridge where Gregory Thomas killed himself, near A Better Tomorrow office he visited beforehand, in Temecula, Calif. Thomas had been brought to the office by a company employee, but never went through with the treatment. (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0014 NYT
Charles Hill, who ran a treatment center in Temecula, Calif. Hill believes the inpatient model for treating clients, like the one used by American Addiction Centers, one of the biggest addiction-treatment companies in the country, is motivated more by greed than doing good. (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0020 NYT
The A Better Tomorrow office that Gregory Thomas went to before he killed himself at a nearby bridge in Temecula, Calif. In a lawsuit filed against the company, a judge ruled that the company wasn't liable because Thomas had not been admitted.(Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0001 NYT
The office of Dr. Michael Ligotti in Delray, Fla. Ligotti was listed as the medical director for nine different drug treatment centers, according to state records in Florida. For some doctors, requisitions written for drug tests can be a lucrative side business, producing fees between $3,000 and $8,000 a month from each clinic or sober home they work with. (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0002 NYT
The Alexandria Innovation Center, a urinalysis lab, in Jupiter, Fla. With drug abuse rising, an array of companies have found new ways to turn the problems of addicts, like rehab and testing, into billable fortunes. (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0003 NYT
In an undated photo, a urine test sample container. Companies that set up urine testing labs have breathlessly pitched how lucrative the business can be: "15 samples per day could yield $800,000 in profit!" (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0009 NYT
Photos of Sean Reyna, an alcoholic who killed himself with a shaving razor in one of American Addiction Centers' treatment houses. Reyna's widow said in a 2014 lawsuit that the staff at the house had ignored signs that her husband was suffering withdrawal symptoms that required urgent medical care. The case is expected to go to trial early in 2018. (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0013 NYT
Rich Sarafian was one of the last people to see J.J. Baker alive before he died of a heroin overdose after being kicked out of his sober living home, in West Palm Beach, Fla. With drug abuse rising, an array of companies have found new ways to turn the problems of addicts, like rehab and testing, into billable fortunes. (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0021 NYT
The phone Alan Goodwin, a psychologist, used to make many of his calls while looking into the rehab industry's customer acquisition tricks, in New York, Aug. 25, 2017. Startled by the hard sell addicts face, Goodwin began his campaign to map the underbelly of the treatment industry. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0024 NYT
Andrew Burki, the chief executive of Life of Purpose Treatment, a group of drug clinics focused on students, in Boca Raton, Fla. Burki has said that a single urine test for a client can cost more than a day of therapy. "The timing of all this could not be worse," Burki said. (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0025 NYT
John Lehman, of the Florida Association of Recovery Residences, in West Palm Beach, Fla. Lehman said that early experiments with drug test billing yielded about $4,200 per test, and each client was tested five times a week. That adds up to $21,000 in billings per week, per client. Some clinics had more than 40 clients. (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0026 NYT
Lizz DeWolfe, the mother of J.J. Baker, who died of a heroin overdose after being kicked out of his sober living home, visits his grave in Forkston, Pa. A few months after Baker started treatment at A New Start, a rehab clinic, in early 2015, two bills arrived at his father's home cataloging dozens of urinalysis tests both from the clinic and from the sober home where he lived totaling $260,000. "We were shocked," said DeWolfe. "It didn't seem possible." (Johnny Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0005 NYT
Daniel Sullivan, a former sober-home manager who said he watched as clinic owners quickly became wealthy, in Prescott, Ariz., August 2017. The drug crisis has turned countless recovered addicts into businesspeople: They get clean, open their own clinics, and sometimes take over the neighborhood. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0006 NYT
Mo Michael, a former gambling addict who said she opened a clinic because she saw a need for higher standards, in Prescott, Ariz., August 2017. The drug crisis has turned countless recovered addicts into businesspeople: They get clean, open their own clinics, and sometimes take over the neighborhood. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0010 NYT
Julie Gorman, the owner of Wild Iris Coffee House, who had to hire a bouncer for her shop to discourage loitering, in Prescott, Ariz., August 2017. The drug crisis has turned countless recovered addicts into businesspeople: They get clean, open their own clinics, and sometimes take over the neighborhood. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0011 NYT
Erin Burk's notes from her months-long investigation into sober living homes in Prescott, Ariz., August 2017. The drug crisis has turned countless recovered addicts into businesspeople: They get clean, open their own clinics, and sometimes take over the neighborhood. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0012 NYT
The historic district in Prescott, Ariz., August 2017. The drug crisis has turned countless recovered addicts into businesspeople: They get clean, open their own clinics, and sometimes take over the neighborhood. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0016 NYT
Two of the ubiquitous white vans associated with sober living homes in Prescott, Ariz., August 2017. The drug crisis has turned countless recovered addicts into businesspeople: They get clean, open their own clinics, and sometimes take over the neighborhood. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0017 NYT
Downtown in Prescott, Ariz., August 2017. The drug crisis has turned countless recovered addicts into businesspeople: They get clean, open their own clinics, and sometimes take over the neighborhood. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0018 NYT
One of the ubiquitous white vans associated with sober living homes in Prescott, Ariz., August 2017. The drug crisis has turned countless recovered addicts into businesspeople: They get clean, open their own clinics, and sometimes take over the neighborhood. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0019 NYT
Erin Burk, who identified dozens of sober living homes in her city, in Prescott, Ariz., August 2017. The drug crisis has turned countless recovered addicts into businesspeople: They get clean, open their own clinics, and sometimes take over the neighborhood. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0023 NYT
Erin Burk, who identified dozens of sober living homes in her city, in Prescott, Ariz., August 2017. The drug crisis has turned countless recovered addicts into businesspeople: They get clean, open their own clinics, and sometimes take over the neighborhood. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0015 NYT
Alan Goodwin, a psychologist, in New York, Aug. 25, 2017. Startled by the hard sell addicts face, Goodwin began a campaign to map the underbelly of the treatment industry. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!
! EN_01296949_0022 NYT
Alan Goodwin, a psychologist, in New York, Aug. 25, 2017. Startled by the hard sell addicts face, Goodwin began a campaign to map the underbelly of the treatment industry. (Tergo/The New York Times)
MINIMALNA CENA 100USD!!!