niedziela, 21 stycznia 2018
zamknij [x]
do:

Korea Północna - Noor Images (32)

! EN_01295456_0026 NOR
DPRK September 2014: A man with the umbrella sitting near a canal is seen from a train traveling from Pyongyang to the Chinese border.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0027 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: Portraits of Eternal President Kim Il-sung (left) and Supreme Leader Kim Jong-il (right) loom above a small, provincial railway station, as seen from a train traveling from Pyongyang to the Chinese border.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0028 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: a small, provincial town , as seen from a train traveling from Pyongyang to the Chinese border.:
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0029 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: A tractor carries labourers as seen from a train travelling from the Chinese border to Pyongyang.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0030 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: People working at the fields are seen from a train traveling from Pyongyang to the Chinese border.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0024 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: The Pyongyang International Film Festival???s closing ceremony at Ponghwa Theatre
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0025 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: The Kaeson Youth Park is an Amusement Park, which opened in 1984, is located near the Kim II Sung Stadium and Moran Hill. It contains a carousel, fun house, and rides such as a Ferris wheel, bumper cars, teacups, a swing ride and a vertical drop slide.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0022 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: women talk under umbrellas walk near apartment buildings in Pyongyang.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0023 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: North Koreans dance on the street of Pyonggyang
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0020 NOR
Pyongsong DPRK September 2014: Kim Jong Suk middle school Kim Jong Suk Middle School a school named after the mother of Kim Jong Il.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0021 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: On the street of Pyongyang
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0006 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: North Koreans watch the performance at People???s Circus
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0019 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: On the street of Pyongyang.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0005 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: A view of apartment buildings in Pyongyang.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0014 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: Pyongyang Metro
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0015 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: Kim Il Sung Square
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0016 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: Kim Il Sung Square
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0017 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: Changwang Spa for massages, hair cuts, swim
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0018 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: Changwang Spa for massages, hair cuts, swim
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0004 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: The screening of Korean film The Other Side of the Mountain at the Pyongyang International Film Festival. Held every two years, the Pyongyang International Film Festival offers North Koreans their only chance to see a wide array of foreign films on the big screen ??" from Britain, Germany and elsewhere (but not America). And it's the only time foreigners are allowed into North Korean theaters to watch movies alongside locals. The festival hosted a programme, organised especially for foreign guests, of what they deemed to be classic films from North Korea???s 60-year history. Virtually all studios and archives were destroyed during the three years of the Korean War. After 1953, the studios had to be rebuilt from scratch. Like Stalin and Mao, Kim Il-sung extolled the propaganda value of cinema, and ordered films reflecting ??ssocialist reality??? to be made: ??sLike the leading article of the Party paper, the cinema should have great appeal and move ahead of the realities??S it should play a mobilising role in the revolutionary struggle.??? From the 1960s until the early 1990s, an average of 20 films were made each year, but it was frequently as many as 100. The Soviet Union and China supplied money and technology and, in turn, North Korean films were screened across the communist territories.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0012 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: People ride on a trolleybus in Pyongyang.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0013 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: North Korean are seen through the window of vintage trolley bus on the street of Pyongyang.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0002 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: A soldiers with the goats crosses the railroad at Pyongyang Film Studio.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0003 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: Photographer Mark Edward Harris takes photos at the Korean Film Studio in Pyongyang. The film studio is a lot like going back in time, from the thatched cottages of a bygone rural Korea, to the ancient royal palaces of the Choson Dynasty, to a louche depiction of 1950s South Korea compete with brothels, pubs and pharmacies.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0010 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: North Koreans cross the road near the Railway Station.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0011 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: Hong Yong Hee, an actress who played the main role at the movie Flower Girl poses for the photos in front of the posters of Korean movies at the International Cinema House The Flower Girl (1970), adapted from a 1930 play written by Kim Il-sung, is a perennial favourite ??" it is referred to as North Korea???s Gone with the Wind. Set in the late 1920s and 1930s, when Korea was under Japanese occupation, it follows the misfortunes of a poor family brutalised by their Japanese landowners. Two sisters sell flowers to pay for medicine needed by their ailing mother who refuses to allow them to degrade themselves. The horrors of Japanese occupation are laid on heavily ??" in one scene the younger sister is blinded by hot grains. There???s a clear message for younger audiences about the suffering their elders endured, and of heroic female sacrifice, both recurrent themes in the programme.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0001 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: Korean actress Ri Wol Suk talks on the cell phone after visiting the opening ceremony of the 14th Pyongyang International Film Festival at the Ponghwa Art Theatre . Pyongyang???s festival was founded in 1987, and has been held every two years since 1990. There were of course no films from America, Japan or South Korea, but the selection included works from Iceland, France (The Page Turner), Australia (Unfinished Sky), the Czech Republic (Empties), Britain (Atonement, Elizabeth: The Golden Age), Germany Held every two years, the Pyongyang International Film Festival offers North Koreans their only chance to see a wide array of foreign films on the big screen ??" from Britain, Germany and elsewhere (but not America). And it's the only time foreigners are allowed into North Korean theaters to watch movies alongside locals.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0008 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: The opening of the 14th Pyongyang International Film Festival at the Ponghwa Art Theatre. Pyongyang???s festival was founded in 1987, and has been held every two years since 1990. Held every two years, the Pyongyang International Film Festival offers North Koreans their only chance to see a wide array of foreign films on the big screen ??" from Britain, Germany and elsewhere (but not America). And it's the only time foreigners are allowed into North Korean theaters to watch movies alongside locals. The 14th PIFF consists of Feature Film Competition, Documentary and Short Film Competition, Special and Informative Screenings and Film Exchange. The festival hosted a programme, organised especially for foreign guests, of what they deemed to be classic films from North Korea???s 60-year history. Virtually all studios and archives were destroyed during the three years of the Korean War. After 1953, the studios had to be rebuilt from scratch. Like Stalin and Mao, Kim Il-sung extolled the propaganda value of cinema, and ordered films reflecting ??ssocialist reality??? to be made: ??sLike the leading article of the Party paper, the cinema should have great appeal and move ahead of the realities??S it should play a mobilising role in the revolutionary struggle.??? From the 1960s until the early 1990s, an average of 20 films were made each year, but it was frequently as many as 100. The Soviet Union and China supplied money and technology and, in turn, North Korean films were screened across the communist territories.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0009 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: The opening of the 14th Pyongyang International Film Festival at the Ponghwa Art Theatre. Pyongyang???s festival was founded in 1987, and has been held every two years since 1990. Held every two years, the Pyongyang International Film Festival offers North Koreans their only chance to see a wide array of foreign films on the big screen ??" from Britain, Germany and elsewhere (but not America). And it's the only time foreigners are allowed into North Korean theaters to watch movies alongside locals. The 14th PIFF consists of Feature Film Competition, Documentary and Short Film Competition, Special and Informative Screenings and Film Exchange. The festival hosted a programme, organised especially for foreign guests, of what they deemed to be classic films from North Korea???s 60-year history. Virtually all studios and archives were destroyed during the three years of the Korean War. After 1953, the studios had to be rebuilt from scratch. Like Stalin and Mao, Kim Il-sung extolled the propaganda value of cinema, and ordered films reflecting ??ssocialist reality??? to be made: ??sLike the leading article of the Party paper, the cinema should have great appeal and move ahead of the realities??S it should play a mobilising role in the revolutionary struggle.??? From the 1960s until the early 1990s, an average of 20 films were made each year, but it was frequently as many as 100. The Soviet Union and China supplied money and technology and, in turn, North Korean films were screened across the communist territories.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0031 NOR
DPRK September 2014: A traffic police man at the crossroads in Kaesong
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0032 NOR
Kaesong DPRK September 2014: A man rides a bicycle pass a new paintings of Eternal President Kim Il-sung and Supreme Leader Kim Jong-il in Koesong.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295456_0007 NOR
Pyongyang DPRK September 2014: The opening of the 14th Pyongyang International Film Festival at the Ponghwa Art Theatre. Pyongyang???s festival was founded in 1987, and has been held every two years since 1990. Held every two years, the Pyongyang International Film Festival offers North Koreans their only chance to see a wide array of foreign films on the big screen ??" from Britain, Germany and elsewhere (but not America). And it's the only time foreigners are allowed into North Korean theaters to watch movies alongside locals. The 14th PIFF consists of Feature Film Competition, Documentary and Short Film Competition, Special and Informative Screenings and Film Exchange. The festival hosted a programme, organised especially for foreign guests, of what they deemed to be classic films from North Korea???s 60-year history. Virtually all studios and archives were destroyed during the three years of the Korean War. After 1953, the studios had to be rebuilt from scratch. Like Stalin and Mao, Kim Il-sung extolled the propaganda value of cinema, and ordered films reflecting ??ssocialist reality??? to be made: ??sLike the leading article of the Party paper, the cinema should have great appeal and move ahead of the realities??S it should play a mobilising role in the revolutionary struggle.??? From the 1960s until the early 1990s, an average of 20 films were made each year, but it was frequently as many as 100. The Soviet Union and China supplied money and technology and, in turn, North Korean films were screened across the communist territories.
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR