niedziela, 21 stycznia 2018
zamknij [x]
do:

Indie, Haiti, Wietnam - problem z toaletami - Noor Images (146)

2... z 2
! EN_01295414_0067 NOR
Vietnam, Tinh Bien District, Vinh Xuyen, 17 February 2017 Phham Thi Lan, 31, and her son, Vinh, 4 years old, at VA?nh Xuy??n village Outdoor toilets often exist over fish farms in southern Vietnam. The local population believes it is good for the fish and isn't detrimental to the health of those eating the fish. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0068 NOR
Vietnam, An Giang Province, Chau Doc, 17 February 2017 Unlike most countries where open defecation is still widely practiced, teenage girls fill the high schools of Vietnam. In majority OD countries, teenage girls drop out due to a lack of privacy (no working toilets) to deal with menstruation. Nguy???n Th??? T??m NhCo (left), 16, student of class of Vo Thi S?Au high school , Chau Doc city, An Giang province, Vietnam There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0069 NOR
Vietnam, An Giang Province, Chau Doc, 17 February 2017 Unlike most countries where open defecation is still widely practiced, teenage girls fill the high schools of Vietnam. In majority OD countries, teenage girls drop out due to a lack of privacy (no working toilets) to deal with menstruation. Nguy???n Th??? T??m NhCo (left), 16, student of class of Vo Thi S?Au high school , Chau Doc city, An Giang province, Vietnam There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0070 NOR
Vietnam, An Giang Province, Chau Doc, 17 February 2017 Unlike most countries where open defecation is still widely practiced, teenage girls fill the high schools of Vietnam. In majority OD countries, teenage girls drop out due to a lack of privacy (no working toilets) to deal with menstruation. Nguy???n Th??? T??m NhCo (left), 16, student of class of Vo Thi S?Au high school , Chau Doc city, An Giang province, Vietnam There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0071 NOR
Vietnam, An Giang Province, Chau Doc, 17 February 2017 Unlike most countries where open defecation is still widely practiced, teenage girls fill the high schools of Vietnam. In majority OD countries, teenage girls drop out due to a lack of privacy (no working toilets) to deal with menstruation. Young students at break time in the yard of Vo Thi Sau high school, at 88 L?? L??Li street, ward Ch??u Ph?? B, of Ch??u A???'c city, In Giang province. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0074 NOR
Vietnam, An Giang Province, Chau Doc, 17 February 2017 Unlike most countries where open defecation is still widely practiced, teenage girls fill the high schools of Vietnam. In majority OD countries, teenage girls drop out due to a lack of privacy (no working toilets) to deal with menstruation. Young students at break time in the yard of Vo Thi Sau high school, at 88 L?? L??Li street, ward Ch??u Ph?? B, of Ch??u A???'c city, In Giang province. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0076 NOR
Vietnam, An Giang Province, Chau Doc, 17 February 2017 Students play volleyball during gym class at Vo Thi Sau High School (88 L?? L??Li street ), Ch??u Ph?? B ward, Ch??u A???'c city, An Giang province, (Mekong Delta ) Vietnam. Unlike most countries where open defecation is still widely practiced, teenage girls fill the high schools of Vietnam. In majority OD countries, teenage girls drop out due to a lack of privacy (no working toilets) to deal with menstruation. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0077 NOR
Vietnam, An Giang Province, Chau Doc, 17 February 2017 Unlike most countries where open defecation is still widely practiced, teenage girls fill the high schools of Vietnam. In majority OD countries, teenage girls drop out due to a lack of privacy (no working toilets) to deal with menstruation. Young students at break time in the yard of Vo Thi Sau high school, at 88 L?? L??Li street, ward Ch??u Ph?? B, of Ch??u A???'c city, In Giang province. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0075 NOR
Vietnam, Ben Tre Province, 16 February 2017 Dao Thannh Lam, 5, uses the toilet in his school. ABT Nursury School, Tan Thach ward, Chau Thanh district, Ben Tre city, Ben Tre province, Much of Vietnam's success was spearheaded by the schools. In all schools built in the past 10 years, indoor plumbing and the rituals of hand-cleaning are mandatory. The ethnic Thai minority village in southern Vietnam, Ben Tre Province. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0078 NOR
Vietnam, Na Tau, 16 February 2017 In much of Vietnam, the use of toilets is an improvement made in the past 10 years. The ethnic Thai minority village in southern Vietnam, Ben Tre Province. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0079 NOR
Vietnam, Ben Tre Province, 16 February 2017 In much of Vietnam, the use of toilets is an improvement made in the past 10 years. The ethnic Thai minority village in southern Vietnam, Ben Tre Province. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0080 NOR
Vietnam, Na Tau, 13 February 2017 L?? Th??? Nh??n, 35, Vietnamese Thai minorities, works on her rice field with water feed by their traditional bambo Water Wheels. This water irrigates her rice paddies and use to be used for household water until 14 years ago with the river water went bad. Her community has not felt the improvements other areas of Dien Bien Province has felt. The ethnic Thai minority village of Na Tau, in northern Vietnam. The five villages in Na Tau have made great efforts to stop open defecation and achieved a goal of 100 percent of households having their own latrines. The villages??? achievement is recognized by ODF verification and certification guidelines developed by the Health Environment Management Agency in 2013, which publicly declares communities??? success in achieving ODF status. Dien Bien is the first province in Viet Nam to apply these guidelines. The province hopes to further build of these impressive results by improving sanitation overall, as only 43 per cent of households in the province have access to latrines. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0081 NOR
Vietnam, Na Tau, 13 February 2017 Lo Thi Yen, 28, prepares her son and daughter for school. The ethnic Thai minority village of Na Tau, in northern Vietnam. The five villages in Na Tau have made great efforts to stop open defecation and achieved a goal of 100 percent of households having their own latrines. The villages??? achievement is recognized by ODF verification and certification guidelines developed by the Health Environment Management Agency in 2013, which publicly declares communities??? success in achieving ODF status. Dien Bien is the first province in Viet Nam to apply these guidelines. The province hopes to further build of these impressive results by improving sanitation overall, as only 43 per cent of households in the province have access to latrines. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0082 NOR
Vietnam, Na Tau, 13 February 2017 Lo Van Pho, 63, waters vegetables in his garden. The ethnic Thai minority village of Na Tau, in northern Vietnam. The five villages in Na Tau have made great efforts to stop open defecation and achieved a goal of 100 percent of households having their own latrines. The villages??? achievement is recognized by ODF verification and certification guidelines developed by the Health Environment Management Agency in 2013, which publicly declares communities??? success in achieving ODF status. Dien Bien is the first province in Viet Nam to apply these guidelines. The province hopes to further build of these impressive results by improving sanitation overall, as only 43 per cent of households in the province have access to latrines. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0083 NOR
Vietnam, Na Tau, 13 February 2017 L?? Th??? Nh??n, 35, works in her rice paddy with water irrigated by their traditional bamboo Water Wheels. This water irrigates her rice paddies and use to be used for household water until 14 years ago with the river water went bad. Her community has not felt the improvements other areas of Dien Bien Province has felt. Five villages in Na Tau have made great efforts to stop open defecation and achieved a goal of 100 percent of households having their own latrines. The villages??? achievement is recognized by ODF verification and certification guidelines developed by the Health Environment Management Agency in 2013, which publicly declares communities??? success in achieving ODF status. Dien Bien is the first province in Viet Nam to apply these guidelines. The province hopes to further build of these impressive results by improving sanitation overall, as only 43 per cent of households in the province have access to latrines. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0084 NOR
Vietnam, Dien Bien, 13 February 2017 A woman works in the rice paddy fields of northern Vietnam where villages are now open-defecation free. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0085 NOR
Vietnam, Na Tau, 12 February 2017 This is one of five villages in Na Tau have made great efforts to stop open defecation and achieved a goal of 100 percent of households having their own latrines. The villages??? achievement is recognized by ODF verification and certification guidelines developed by the Health Environment Management Agency in 2013, which publicly declares communities??? success in achieving ODF status. Dien Bien is the first province in Viet Nam to apply these guidelines. The province hopes to further build of these impressive results by improving sanitation overall, as only 43 per cent of households in the province have access to latrines. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0086 NOR
Vietnam, Na Tau, 12 February 2017 L?? Th??? Xi??zn, cooks for a party with her 2 years old grand son L?? VA?n Huy strapped to her back in the ethnic Thai minority village of Na Tau, in northern Vietnam. This is one of five villages in Na Tau have made great efforts to stop open defecation and achieved a goal of 100 percent of households having their own latrines. The villages??? achievement is recognized by ODF verification and certification guidelines developed by the Health Environment Management Agency in 2013, which publicly declares communities??? success in achieving ODF status. Dien Bien is the first province in Viet Nam to apply these guidelines. The province hopes to further build of these impressive results by improving sanitation overall, as only 43 per cent of households in the province have access to latrines. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0089 NOR
Vietnam, Na Tau, 12 February 2017 L?? Th??? Xi??zn, cooks for a party with her 2 years old grand son L?? VA?n Huy strapped to her back in the ethnic Thai minority village of Na Tau, in northern Vietnam. This is one of five villages in Na Tau have made great efforts to stop open defecation and achieved a goal of 100 percent of households having their own latrines. The villages??? achievement is recognized by ODF verification and certification guidelines developed by the Health Environment Management Agency in 2013, which publicly declares communities??? success in achieving ODF status. Dien Bien is the first province in Viet Nam to apply these guidelines. The province hopes to further build of these impressive results by improving sanitation overall, as only 43 per cent of households in the province have access to latrines. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0090 NOR
Vietnam, Na Tau, 12 February 2017 L?? Th??? Xi??zn, cooks for a party with her 2 years old grand son L?? VA?n Huy strapped to her back in the ethnic Thai minority village of Na Tau, in northern Vietnam. This is one of five villages in Na Tau have made great efforts to stop open defecation and achieved a goal of 100 percent of households having their own latrines. The villages??? achievement is recognized by ODF verification and certification guidelines developed by the Health Environment Management Agency in 2013, which publicly declares communities??? success in achieving ODF status. Dien Bien is the first province in Viet Nam to apply these guidelines. The province hopes to further build of these impressive results by improving sanitation overall, as only 43 per cent of households in the province have access to latrines. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0087 NOR
Vietnam, Hanoi, 10 February 2017 In much of Vietnam, the use of toilets is an improvement made in the past 10 years. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0088 NOR
Vietnam, Hanoi, 10 February 2017 In much of Vietnam, the use of toilets is an improvement made in the past 10 years. There is a clear geographical correlation that exists here in Vietnam, between the lack of access to sanitation and the rates of poverty and stunting in the country. In the Northern Mountains and the Central Highlands regions, rates of stunting and poverty are high and access to sanitation is among the lowest in Vietnam. Approximately 21% of the rural population in these regions defecate in the open. However, in addition to these linkages, a further dimension of sanitation inequality exists in Vietnam, that of ethnicity. In the Northern Mountains and Central Highlands regions, the rate of open defecation increases to 31% for the ethnic minorities. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0004 NOR
India, Delhi, 08 February 2017 People look for a place to defecate on the railroad tracks early in the morning in the Anna Nagar slum, Nizzamudin area. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0005 NOR
India, Delhi, 08 February 2017 People look for a place to defecate on the railroad tracks early in the morning in the Anna Nagar slum, Nizzamudin area. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0006 NOR
India, Delhi, Wazirabad, 08 February 2017 Prakash, 10, and Raees, 11, play in the heavily polluted Yamuna River where 18 drains from New Delhi dump 600 million gallons of sewage every year. The boys thought the bubbles were signs of soap, though many people acknowledge that the bubbles are from sewage and industrial runoff. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0007 NOR
India, Delhi, Wazirabad, 08 February 2017 Prakash, 10, and Raees, 11, play in the heavily polluted Yamuna River where 18 drains from New Delhi dump 600 million gallons of sewage every year. The boys thought the bubbles were signs of soap, though many people acknowledge that the bubbles are from sewage and industrial runoff. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0008 NOR
India, Delhi, Wazirabad, 08 February 2017 Prakash, 10, and Raees, 11, play in the heavily polluted Yamuna River where 18 drains from New Delhi dump 600 million gallons of sewage every year. The boys thought the bubbles were signs of soap, though many people acknowledge that the bubbles are from sewage and industrial runoff. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0009 NOR
India, Delhi, Wazirabad, 08 February 2017 Prakash, 10, and Raees, 11, play in the heavily polluted Yamuna River where 18 drains from New Delhi dump 600 million gallons of sewage every year. The boys thought the bubbles were signs of soap, though many people acknowledge that the bubbles are from sewage and industrial runoff. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0010 NOR
India, Dehli, Wazirabad, 08 February 2017 Boys play in the heavily polluted Yamuna River where 18 drains from New Delhi dump 600 million gallons of sewage every year. The boys thought the bubbles were signs of soap, though many people acknowledge that the bubbles are from sewage and industrial runoff. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0011 NOR
India, Dehli, 08 February 2017 Early in the morning, residents of the Anna Nagar slum in the Nizzamudin area of Delhi, use the bathroom on the railroad tracks. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0012 NOR
India, Dehli, 08 February 2017 Early in the morning, residents of the Anna Nagar slum in the Nizzamudin area of Delhi, use the bathroom on the railroad tracks. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0091 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 29 January 2017 There is barely a system to take care of sewage, sanitation and garbage in Port au Prince. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0092 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 29 January 2017 There is barely a system to take care of sewage, sanitation and garbage in Port au Prince. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0096 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 28 January 2017 Matteis Exalus, 44, (hat), Roger Dume, 45, (white shirt) and Exilian Cena, 44, have worked together as bayakou for around 20 years, they said. Bayakou crawl into pit toilet holes to empty the feces inside by hand and bucket, completely emerging themselves in sewage. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0097 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 28 January 2017 Matteis Exalus, 44, (hat), Roger Dume, 45, (white shirt) and Exilian Cena, 44, have worked together as bayakou for around 20 years, they said. Bayakou crawl into pit toilet holes to empty the feces inside by hand and bucket, completely emerging themselves in sewage. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0093 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 27 January 2017 Matteis Exalus, 44, (hat), Roger Dume, 45, (white shirt) and Exilian Cena, 44, have worked together as bayakou for around 20 years, they said. Bayakou crawl into pit toilet holes to empty the feces inside by hand and bucket, completely emerging themselves in sewage. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0094 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 27 January 2017 Matteis Exalus, 44, (hat), Roger Dume, 45, (white shirt) and Exilian Cena, 44, have worked together as bayakou for around 20 years, they said. Bayakou crawl into pit toilet holes to empty the feces inside by hand and bucket, completely emerging themselves in sewage. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0095 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 27 January 2017 Matteis Exalus, 44, (hat), Roger Dume, 45, (white shirt) and Exilian Cena, 44, have worked together as bayakou for around 20 years, they said. Bayakou crawl into pit toilet holes to empty the feces inside by hand and bucket, completely emerging themselves in sewage. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0098 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 27 January 2017 Matteis Exalus, 44, (hat), Roger Dume, 45, (white shirt) and Exilian Cena, 44, have worked together as bayakou for around 20 years, they said. Bayakou crawl into pit toilet holes to empty the feces inside by hand and bucket, completely emerging themselves in sewage. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0104 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 27 January 2017 Matteis Exalus, 44, (hat), Roger Dume, 45, (white shirt) and Exilian Cena, 44, have worked together as bayakou for around 20 years, they said. Bayakou crawl into pit toilet holes to empty the feces inside by hand and bucket, completely emerging themselves in sewage. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0105 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 27 November 2016 Bayakou are people who empty pit latrines by hand. They crawl into the holes under toilet seats, usually in outhouses, and use buckets or bare hands to scoop up feces and place it in bags. The bags are then usually dropped in a nearby trash area or ravine. Even though most people in Haiti hire them for this job, they are stigmatized for the smell that permeates the area. They work mostly at night to avoid being seen. Sometimes people throw stones or yell threats. In addition, disease, snakes and spiders, and electrical lines make their job dangerous. Many bayakou have organized into a collective; a push to make the job more respected as most Haitians who have toilets rely on them. Other ways to empty pit latrines are too expensive for most Haitians. Matteis Exalus, 44, (hat), Roger Dume, 45, (white shirt) and Exilian Cena, 44, have worked together as bayakou for around 20 years, Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0103 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, 19 December 2016 A working outhouse stands near a home on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince. Proper sanitation is an issue in Haiti which bring extreme health problems to the public, exacerbated by natural disasters and cholera. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0102 NOR
Haiti, Cap Haitian, 25 November 2016 Toilets, for sale on the streets of Cap Haitian. Toilets are considered a symbol of wealth in Haiti. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0099 NOR
Haiti, Cap Haitian, 24 November 2016 The slums of northern Haiti suffered from cholera after Hurricane Matthew, exacerbated by their lack of proper toilets. In this slum people often defecate in the lanes between their homes. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0100 NOR
Haiti, Cap Haitian, 24 November 2016 A SOIL worker collects the refuse from their composting toilets and distributes new composting toilets in Sada II. The waste is then composted at the SOIL composting site in Limonade, Haiti, just outside Cap Haitian. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0101 NOR
Haiti, Cap Haitian, 24 November 2016 A family in the Sada II reads directions for their new composting toilet (seen in the corner) supplied by the aid organization SOIL. SOIL collects the refuse from their composting toilets, distributes new composting toilets in Sada II and waste to the compost site in Limonade. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0107 NOR
Haiti, Cap Haitian, 24 November 2016 The slums of northern Haiti suffered from cholera after Hurricane Matthew, exacerbated by their lack of proper toilets. In this slum people often defecate in the lanes between their homes. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0108 NOR
Haiti, Cap Haitian, 24 November 2016 The slums of northern Haiti suffered from cholera after Hurricane Matthew, exacerbated by their lack of proper toilets. In this slum people often defecate in the lanes between their homes. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0109 NOR
Haiti, Cap Haitian, 24 November 2016 SOIL collects the refuse from their composting toilets, distributes new composting toilets in Sada II and the waste compost site in Limonade. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0110 NOR
Haiti, Cap Haitian, 24 November 2016 SOIL collects the refuse from their composting toilets, distributes new composting toilets in Sada II and the waste compost site in Limonade. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0111 NOR
Haiti, Cap Haitian, 24 November 2016 SOIL collects the refuse from their composting toilets, distributes new composting toilets in Sada II and the waste compost site in Limonade. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0106 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 22 November 2016 Hurricane Matthew caused mass destruction in Haiti the first week of October, flooding rivers and villages and making it difficult to reach many remote areas in the mountains of the south. Due to poor sanitation and cholera, many faced death. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0112 NOR
Haiti, Chantal, 21 November 2016 Hurricane Matthew destroyed the home of the Bellevue family. Now nine family members live in one shack hastily built in the past few weeks. Barbara Bellevue, 16, and Sterline Bellevue, 14, take care of their sister's baby, born less than a week after the Hurricane. It still doesn't have a name. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0113 NOR
Haiti, Rendell, 20 November 2016 The roof of the Elise Saint Andre de Rendell Catholic church was completely swept away during Hurricane Matthew. The partitioners still hold services in the church when there is no rain. Rendell suffered a heavy outbreak of cholera after the hurricane. it is now under control in the town but new outbreaks have emerged from other villages down the mountain. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0115 NOR
Haiti, Port-a-Piment, 20 November 2016 Families hike for hours, crossing a raging river 9 times, to reach the nearest city that is accessible by car. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, has reappeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Most are caused by direct contact with infected water and poor sanitation. A cholera vaccination has been provided by the government but is only around 50 percent effective, giving many Haitians a false feeling of invincibility. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0116 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 20 November 2016 Hurricane Matthew caused mass destruction in Haiti the first week of October, flooding rivers and villages and making it difficult to reach many remote areas in the mountains of the south. Due to poor sanitation and cholera, many faced death. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0118 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 20 November 2016 Hurricane Matthew caused mass destruction in Haiti the first week of October, flooding rivers and villages and making it difficult to reach many remote areas in the mountains of the south. Due to poor sanitation and cholera, many faced death. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0114 NOR
Haiti, Roche A Bateau, 19 November 2016 The Elise Adventure Morija Church was completely swept away during Hurricane Matthew. The parishioners still hold services on the foundation of the church, under a tent. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0119 NOR
Haiti, Rendell, 19 November 2016 Evens Versaillo, 13, and Rosebrune Sander give a family hiking to their home in a remote region of southern Haiti, a drink of water in a river. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, has reappeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Most are caused by direct contact with infected water and poor sanitation. A cholera vaccination has been provided by the government but is only around 50 percent effective, giving many Haitians a false feeling of invincibility. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0117 NOR
Haiti, Jeremie, 18 November 2016 A man cleans his clothes in a stream that flows from the mountains, carrying trash from all over the region to his neighborhood. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, has reappeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Most are caused by direct contact with infected water and poor sanitation. A cholera vaccination has been provided by the government but is only around 50 percent effective, giving many Haitians a false feeling of invincibility. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0123 NOR
Haiti, Jeremie, 18 November 2016 Fritznel Xavier, 15, receives a rehydration IV at a Cholera Treatment Center (CTC) in Jeremie, one of the cities hardest hit by the cholera epidemic. Fritznel's parents carried him 6 hours to the CTC after realizing he might have it earlier that morning. Cholera is now heavily present throughout the south, rising and falling with the rain that carries sewage down the rivers, spreading infected water. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared after the 2010 earthquake, has reappeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0120 NOR
Haiti, 17 November 2016 Residents clean themselves and their clothes in a stream that flows from the mountains. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared after the 2010 earthquake, has appeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Most are caused by direct contact with infected water and poor sanitation. A cholera vaccination has been provided by the government but is only around 50 percent effective, giving many Haitians a false feeling of invincibility. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0121 NOR
Haiti, Les Irois, 17 November 2016 Residents clean themselves and their clothes in a stream that flows from the mountains. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared after the 2010 earthquake, has appeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Most are caused by direct contact with infected water and poor sanitation. A cholera vaccination has been provided by the government but is only around 50 percent effective, giving many Haitians a false feeling of invincibility. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0122 NOR
Haiti, Dame Marie, 17 November 2016 June Volontiaire suffers from cholera in Dame Marie, Haiti. She was brought in by her daughter who helps care for her in the center. The constant rain has made cholera difficult to control and continues to cause outbreaks throughout the south. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0124 NOR
Haiti, Dame Marie, 17 November 2016 Clairvicia Conseillant bails out her home which was destroyed by Hurricane Matthew in October. The persistent rain has made it impossible to rebuild. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0125 NOR
Haiti, Les Irois, 17 November 2016 Residents of Les Irois line up in front of the town hall to find jobs -- which are scarce. Hurricane Matthew destroyed the farms, fishing boats and tools needed for most of the industries southern Haiti depends on. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0126 NOR
Haiti, Les Irois, 17 November 2016 Cholera patients receive rehydration IVs at a Cholera Treatment Center (CTC) in southern Haiti. Cholera is now heavily present throughout the south, rising and falling with the rain that carries sewage down the rivers, spreading infected water. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared after the 2010 earthquake, has reappeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0127 NOR
Haiti, Dame Marie, 17 November 2016 June Volontiaire suffers from cholera in Dame Marie, Haiti. She was brought in by her daughter who helps care for her in the center. The constant rain has made cholera difficult to control and continues to cause outbreaks throughout the south. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0128 NOR
Haiti, Dame Marie, 17 November 2016 Residents of Dame Marie clean themselves and their clothes in a stream that flows from the mountains. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared after the 2010 earthquake, has appeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Most are caused by direct contact with infected water and poor sanitation. A cholera vaccination has been provided by the government but is only around 50 percent effective, giving many Haitians a false feeling of invincibility. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0072 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 16 November 2016 In the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, people defecate behind wrecked boats. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0073 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 16 November 2016 In the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, people defecate behind wrecked boats. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0129 NOR
Haiti, Lemaire, 16 November 2016 A Cholera Treatment Center (CTC) in the mountains of southern Haiti offers treatment for cholera victims. Cholera is now heavily present throughout the south, rising and falling with the rain that carries sewage down the rivers, spreading infected water. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared after the 2010 earthquake, has reappeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0130 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 16 November 2016 Surrounded by the destruction caused by Hurricane Matthew, Pharana Pierre washes clothes while her daughter Carla Michele, 6, plays in in the water. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared after the 2010 earthquake, has appeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Most are caused by direct contact with infected water and poor sanitation. A cholera vaccination has been provided by the government but is only around 50 percent effective, giving many Haitians a false feeling of invincibility. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0131 NOR
Haiti, Moron, 16 November 2016 Bricthone Tabeline, 11, Ashley Romelus, 4, Britanie Romelus, 6, and Isadora Joseph, 10, study on the foundation of their home which was destroyed in October's Hurricane Matthew. Only the door frame remains. They live in a quickly-built shack behind their home. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0132 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 16 November 2016 Surrounded by the destruction caused by Hurricane Matthew, Pharana Pierre washes clothes while her daughter Carla Michele, 6, plays in in the water. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared after the 2010 earthquake, has appeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Most are caused by direct contact with infected water and poor sanitation. A cholera vaccination has been provided by the government but is only around 50 percent effective, giving many Haitians a false feeling of invincibility. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0133 NOR
Haiti, Moron, 16 November 2016 A river in remote southern Haiti was finally crossable after a couple days without rain. Residents from nearby remote villages were finally able to cross to buy and sell goods. Hurricane Matthew caused mass destruction in Haiti the first week of October, flooding rivers and villages and making it difficult to reach many remote areas in the mountains of the south. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0134 NOR
Haiti, Moron, 16 November 2016 Bricthone Tabeline, 11, and Isadora Joseph, 10, study on the foundation of their home which was destroyed in October's Hurricane Matthew. Only the door frame remains. They live in a quickly-built shack behind their home. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0135 NOR
Haiti, Moron, 16 November 2016 A river in remote southern Haiti was finally crossable after a couple days without rain. Residents from nearby remote villages were finally able to cross to buy and sell goods. Hurricane Matthew caused mass destruction in Haiti the first week of October, flooding rivers and villages and making it difficult to reach many remote areas in the mountains of the south. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0136 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 16 November 2016 Hurricane Matthew caused mass destruction in Haiti the first week of October, flooding rivers and villages and making it difficult to reach many remote areas in the mountains of the south. Due to poor sanitation and cholera, many faced death. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0063 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 15 November 2016 Aftermath of hurricane Matthew. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0064 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 15 November 2016 Hurricane Matthew battered Haiti with 145 mile an hour winds, halting the slow reconstruction that???s been under way since 2010???s devastating earthquake. Some 175,000 people were displaced in the immediate aftermath of Matthew, as homes, health clinics, and schools were toppled. From the rubble and murky water, a familiar enemy returned: cholera. Rose Dena, 85, attempts to clean what is left of her home in the mountains of southern Haiti weeks after Hurricane Matthew. The storm killed an estimated 1600 people in the country. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0065 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 15 November 2016 Students who attend public schools now inhabited by people displaced by Hurricane Matthew, protested and blocked intersections throughout the city. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0066 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 16 November 2016 People displaced by Hurricane Matthew take refuge at public school Dumarsais Estime in Les Cayes, Haiti. Students who normally attend the school protested their presence and blocked intersections throughout the city. Juliette (mother) and Shedline Charles, 4, brushing teeth in bad water. Fidel Constantine, 39, man showering with blue underwear. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0139 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 15 November 2016 People displaced by Hurricane Matthew take refuge at public school Dumarsais Estime in Les Cayes, Haiti. Students who normally attend the school protested their presence and blocked intersections throughout the city. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0140 NOR
Haiti, Northern Haiti, November 2016 Community toilets in northern Haiti. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0141 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, November 2016 A working make-shift toilet outside of Port au Prince. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0142 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, November 2016 A working make-shift toilet outside of Port au Prince. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0143 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, November 2016 Working flush toilet outside of Port au Prince. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0144 NOR
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, November 2016 Working flush toilet outside of Port au Prince. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0145 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 16 November 2016 People displaced by Hurricane Matthew take refuge at public school Dumarsais Estime in Les Cayes, Haiti. Students who normally attend the school protested their presence and blocked intersections throughout the city. Juliette (mother) and Shedline Charles, 4, brushing teeth in bad water. Fidel Constantine, 39, man showering with blue underwear. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0146 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 15 November 2016 People displaced by Hurricane Matthew take refuge at public school Dumarsais Estime in Les Cayes, Haiti. Students who normally attend the school protested their presence and blocked intersections throughout the city. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0137 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 14 November 2016 Yphemie Luc holds her daughter, Bernaida Augustin's, 11, face while getting ready for their first day back at school since Hurricane Matthew. Their homes were destroyed during Hurricane Matthew, forcing them to flee to this makeshift displacement camp near Les Cayes. Two weeks ago Bernaida contracted cholera and was taken to a Cholera Treatment Center in Les Cayes to recover. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared after the 2010 earthquake, has reappeared in the form of outbreaks in the hurricane-effected areas. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0138 NOR
Haiti, Les Cayes, 14 November 2016 People living in a makeshift displacement camp called "Abri Lafwa" or "Faith Shelter" outside Les Cayes, Haiti, receive a cholera vaccine provided by the Haitian government. A resurgence of cholera, which first appeared after the 2010 earthquake, has reappeared in the form of outbreaks all over the hurricane-effected areas. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0025 NOR
India, New Delhi, 07 October 2016 In a game much like musical chairs, children from a near-by slum are taught how to use squat-toilets correctly. Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0026 NOR
India, New Delhi, 07 October 2016 Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Water is often supplied by the government for one hour every morning causing a mad rush to the taps. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0027 NOR
India, New Delhi, 07 October 2016 Community toilets are one answer to India's lack of toilets. But without a system for maintenance and cleaning, defecation remains a health problem. These four are waiting for the one open, working stall to open for use. Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0028 NOR
India, New Delhi, 07 October 2016 Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Water is often supplied by the government for one hour every morning causing a mad rush to the taps. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0029 NOR
India, New Delhi, 07 October 2016 In a New Delhi slum, Sundar Kumar, 27, bathes from a well next to a garbage dump where people defecate in the open. Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0030 NOR
India, New Delhi, 07 October 2016 Community toilets are one answer to India's lack of toilets. But without a system for maintenance and cleaning, defecation remains a health problem. These four are waiting for the one open, working stall to open for use. Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0031 NOR
India, New Delhi, 07 October 2016 Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Water is often supplied by the government for one hour every morning causing a mad rush to the taps. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0032 NOR
India, New Delhi, 07 October 2016 Community toilets are one answer to India's lack of toilets. But without a system for maintenance and cleaning, defecation remains a health problem. These four are waiting for the one open, working stall to open for use. Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0034 NOR
India, New Delhi, 07 October 2016 In a New Delhi slum, Sundar Kumar, 27, bathes from a well next to a garbage dump where people defecate in the open. Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0033 NOR
India, Bhopal, 06 October 2016 Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Water is often supplied by the government for one hour every morning causing a mad rush to the taps. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0037 NOR
India, Bhopal, 05 October 2016 Community Led Sanitation (CLS) is sometimes used in villages to stop open defecation. Through shaming and using a hair placed in shit (this is the term researchers use) and placing it in a glass of drinking water, the instructor demonstrates how open defecation infects their water supply. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0038 NOR
India, near Bhopal, 05 October 2016 Santoshi Tiwari, a field worker with Smarten, a local nonprofit, explains how feces circulates through the town on the legs of flies, in water and in dust, triggering disgust in order to convince the community to stop defecating in the open. Community Led Sanitation (CLS) is sometimes used in villages to stop open defecation. Through shaming and using a hair placed in shit (this is the term researchers use) and placing it in a glass of drinking water, the instructor demonstrates how open defecation infects their water supply. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0039 NOR
India, Bhopal, 05 October 2016 Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Water is often supplied by the government for one hour every morning causing a mad rush to the taps. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0040 NOR
India, near Bhopal, 05 October 2016 A village votes in favor of using toilets instead of defecating in the open due to a CLS "triggering" by Smarten, a local nonprofit. Community Led Sanitation (CLS) is sometimes used in villages to stop open defecation. Through shaming and using a hair placed in shit (this is the term researchers use) and placing it in a glass of drinking water, the instructor demonstrates how open defecation infects their water supply. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0041 NOR
India, near Bhopal, 05 October 2016 Santoshi Tiwari, a field worker with Smarten, a local nonprofit, explains how feces circulates through the town on the legs of flies, in water and in dust, triggering disgust in order to convince the community to stop defecating in the open. Community Led Sanitation (CLS) is sometimes used in villages to stop open defecation. Through shaming and using a hair placed in shit (this is the term researchers use) and placing it in a glass of drinking water, the instructor demonstrates how open defecation infects their water supply. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0036 NOR
India, Bhopal, 04 October 2016 A family in a Bhopal slum stands outside their home toilet. Health and work has improved dramatically since toilets came to their area. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0035 NOR
India, Bhopal, 03 October 2016 Early in the morning, locals and travelers use the bathroom on the railroad tracks. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0042 NOR
India, New Delhi, 02 October 2016 Community toilets are one answer to India's lack of toilets. But without a system for maintenance and cleaning, defecation remains a health problem. These four are waiting for the one open, working stall to open for use. Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0043 NOR
India, New Delhi, 02 October 2016 Community toilets are one answer to India's lack of toilets. But without a system for maintenance and cleaning, defecation remains a health problem. These four are waiting for the one open, working stall to open for use. Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0044 NOR
India, New Delhi, 02 October 2016 Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Water is often supplied by the government for one hour every morning causing a mad rush to the taps. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0045 NOR
India, New Delhi, 02 October 2016 Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Water is often supplied by the government for one hour every morning causing a mad rush to the taps. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0046 NOR
India, New Delhi, 02 October 2016 Baby, 10, sits outside her home in a New Delhi slum. Her family says she has suffers from constant diarrhea. Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Water is often supplied by the government for one hour every morning causing a mad rush to the taps. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0047 NOR
India, New Delhi, 02 October 2016 Community toilets are one answer to India's lack of toilets. But without a system for maintenance and cleaning, defecation remains a health problem. These four are waiting for the one open, working stall to open for use. Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0048 NOR
India, New Delhi, 01 October 2016 Open defecation may happen in India's villages more often, but it has a deeper impact on the water supply in India's slums. Organizations like Water Aid work to provide toilets in the slums of cities like New Delhi. But they are a small fraction of what is necessary to maintain a healthy water supply and sanitary living conditions. Water is often supplied by the government for one hour every morning causing a mad rush to the taps. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0049 NOR
India, Peepli Kheera, 30 September 2016 About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0050 NOR
India, Peepli Kheera, 30 September 2016 The Indian government has promised every Indian a toilet by 2019. But here, you can see a government-built toilet that is unused and broken. Building toilets is only part of the problem. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0051 NOR
India, near Bhubaneswar, 30 September 2016 Without proper sanitation, good water is hard to fine. Most villages receive their water from wells which are often contaminated through open defecation. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0052 NOR
India, near Bhubaneswar, 30 September 2016 Without proper sanitation, good water is hard to fine. Most villages receive their water from wells which are often contaminated through open defecation. Sulhab Das is an aid organization that works with villages to supply toilets and tap water. If a household splits the cost of building a toilet, then Sulhab Das gives them a faucet of running water inside their home. In this school there is no working toilet. Girls often drop out of school at age 13 after they begin menstruating because there is no private place to take care of it. The majority of those who defecate in the open are Hindu. Around 40 percent are Muslim. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0053 NOR
India, near Bhubaneswar, 30 September 2016 Without proper sanitation, good water is hard to fine. Most villages receive their water from wells which are often contaminated through open defecation. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0054 NOR
India, near Bhubaneswar, 30 September 2016 Without proper sanitation, good water is hard to fine. Most villages receive their water from wells which are often contaminated through open defecation. Sulhab Das is an aid organization that works with villages to supply toilets and tap water. If a household splits the cost of building a toilet, then Sulhab Das gives them a faucet of running water inside their home. In this school there is no working toilet. Girls often drop out of school at age 13 after they begin menstruating because there is no private place to take care of it. The majority of those who defecate in the open are Hindu. Around 40 percent are Muslim. About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0013 NOR
India, near Bhubaneswar, 29 September 2016 Without proper sanitation, good water is hard to fine. Most villages receive their water from wells which are often contaminated through open defecation. Gram Vikas is an aid organization that works with villages to supply toilets and tap water. If a household splits the cost of building a toilet, then Gram Vikas gives them a faucet of running water inside their home. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0022 NOR
India, Samiapalli, 29 September 2016 Jhilli Pradhan cooks breakfast for her husband's family with tap water provided by the aid organization Gram Vikas. The family received running water after building a working outhouse in their back yard. Without proper sanitation, good water is hard to fine. Most villages receive their water from wells which are often contaminated through open defecation. Gram Vikas is an aid organization that works with villages to supply toilets and tap water. If a household splits the cost of building a toilet, then Gram Vikas gives them a faucet of running water inside their home. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0023 NOR
India, Samiapalli, 29 September 2016 Jhilli Pradhan cooks breakfast for her husband's family with tap water provided by the aid organization Gram Vikas. The family received running water after building a working outhouse in their back yard. Without proper sanitation, good water is hard to fine. Most villages receive their water from wells which are often contaminated through open defecation. Gram Vikas is an aid organization that works with villages to supply toilets and tap water. If a household splits the cost of building a toilet, then Gram Vikas gives them a faucet of running water inside their home. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0024 NOR
India, near Bhubaneswar, 29 September 2016 Without proper sanitation, good water is hard to fine. Most villages receive their water from wells which are often contaminated through open defecation. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR
! EN_01295414_0055 NOR
India, Peepli Kheera, 29 September 2016 About half of Indians defecate outside without using toilets. The result is that children pick up parasites and chronic infections that impair the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients ??" and 117,000 Indian children die each year from diarrhea, according to Unicef. Andrea Bruce / NOOR
MINIMUM PRICE 100 EUR

góra

2... z 2