niedziela, 21 stycznia 2018
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Stan wyjątkowy we Francji - Polaris (27)

EN_01289848_0001 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Soldiers patrol near the Eiffel tower. Thousands of soldiers are deployed across France as part of the government's response against terrorism. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0002 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Soldiers patrol near the Eiffel tower. Thousands of soldiers are deployed across France as part of the government's response against terrorism. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0003 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Soldiers patrol near the Eiffel tower. Thousands of soldiers are deployed across France as part of the government's response against terrorism. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0004 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Soldiers patrol near the Eiffel tower. Thousands of soldiers are deployed across France as part of the government's response against terrorism. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0006 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Tourists ask a question to a French soldier patrolling near the Eiffel tower. Thousands of soldiers are deployed across France as part of the government's response against terrorism. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0007 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Soldiers patrol near the Eiffel tower. Thousands of soldiers are deployed across France as part of the government's response against terrorism. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0008 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Soldiers patrol near the Eiffel tower. Thousands of soldiers are deployed across France as part of the government's response against terrorism. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0009 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Soldiers patrol near the Eiffel tower. Thousands of soldiers are deployed across France as part of the government's response against terrorism. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0010 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: A soldier stands guard near the town hall of Paris' third district as a child plays nearby. Thousands of soldiers are deployed across France as part of the government's response against terrorism. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0013 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Facade of the Bataclan concert hall, where the deadliest attack took place on November 13, 2015. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0014 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Portrait of Cedric, a French anarchist who was briefly put under house arrest by the police in late 2015, after the government declared a state of emergency. Cedric is one of 24 people with no link to the Islamist movement who was then subject to France's new anti-terror provisions. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0015 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Portrait of Cedric, a French anarchist who was briefly put under house arrest by the police in late 2015, after the government declared a state of emergency. Cedric is one of 24 people with no link to the Islamist movement who was then subject to France's new anti-terror provisions. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0016 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Portrait of Cedric, a French anarchist who was briefly put under house arrest by the police in late 2015, after the government declared a state of emergency. Cedric is one of 24 people with no link to the Islamist movement who was then subject to France's new anti-terror provisions. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0017 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Paris, France: Facade of the Bataclan concert hall, where the deadliest attack took place on November 13, 2015. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0018 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi as he goes on bicycle to one of his four daily rendez-vous at the local police station. Daoudi is one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0022 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest, after signing up at the local police station. Daoudi has to sign a document four times per day at this police station. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0023 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0024 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0025 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0026 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest, poses near the road sign with the name of the small town he is not allowed to leave. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0027 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest, poses near the road sign with the name of the small town he is not allowed to leave. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0028 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest, in front of the former court in Saint-Jean d'Angely. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0029 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest, at his motel. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0030 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest, reflected on the screen of his tablet as he sits in his motel. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0031 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Interior of Kamel Daoudi's motel room. He is one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0032 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest, at his motel. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017
EN_01289848_0035 PLA
November 7, 2017 - Saint-Jean d'Angely, France: Portrait of Kamel Daoudi, one of the people who has been living for the longest time in France under house arrest. Daoudi has been living under house arrest since 2008, after he was released from prison. French police has moved him to a hotel Saint-Jean d'Angely, a small town north of Bordeaux, despite his family living in southern France. The idea is to keep Daoudi far from any Muslim community or any land border. After being convicted in 2005 of plotting to blow up the US embassy in Paris, Daoudi was stripped of his French nationality. Daoudi acknowledged visiting Afghanistan's jihadist camps in 2001 out of "curiosity", but rejected the other accusations. The French government's intention to deport him to Algeria has been suspended by the European Court of Justice, which argues that he could be tortured in his home country. Daoudi's family left Algeria for France when he was aged only 5. His lawyer is due to contest his house arrest in front of France's Constitutional Council on November 22. French lawmakers approved on October 3, 2017, a tough new anti-terror law that makes permanent some of the exceptional measures contained in the state of emergency imposed after the November 2015 Paris attacks, including police expanded powers to search homes, place people under house arrest and close places of worship. (Mehdi Chebil/Polaris)
No publication in Scandinavia before Nov. 20, 2017